The 5 Most Expensive Paintings In The World

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The 5 Most Expensive Paintings In The World

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There’s no doubt that many people would agree that the majority of artwork found in museums and private collections around the world are priceless. Being one of a kind, it makes it difficult to put a price on many works; however, almost on a daily basis, art is sold and bought, oftentimes bringing hefty price tags that most will never be able to afford. We take a look at some of the artworks – from Old Masters to contemporary works – that no one can deny are some of the most expensive in the world.

1.Salvator Mundi

Price: $450.3 M

Salvator Mundi is a painting by Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, dated to c. 1500. The painting shows Jesus in Renaissance dress, making the sign of the cross with his right hand, while holding a transparent rock crystal orb in his left hand, signaling his role as Salvator Mundi (Latin for “Savior of the World”) and master of the cosmos, and representing the ‘crystalline sphere’ of the heavens, as it was perceived during the Renaissance. Around 20 other versions of the work are known, by students and followers of Leonardo. Preparatory chalk and ink drawings of the drapery by Leonardo are held in the Royal Collection. 

2.The Card Players

Price: $250 M

The Card Players is a series of oil paintings by the French Post-Impressionist artist Paul Cézanne. Painted during Cézanne’s final period in the early 1890s, there are five paintings in the series. The versions vary in size, the number of players, and the setting in which the game takes place. Cézanne also completed numerous drawings and studies in preparation for The Card Players series. One version of The Card Players was sold in 2011 to the Royal Family of Qatar for a price variously estimated at between $250 million. It was thought to be sold to the Davis family out of Florida in the United States for a estimated $225 million usd. ($278.4 million today) and possibly as high as $300 million ($334.1 million today), either price signifying a new mark for highest ever price for a painting, not surpassed until November 2017

 

3.Nafea faa ipoipo

Price: $210 M

When Will You Marry? (French: Quand te maries-tu ?, Tahitian: Nafea faa ipoipo) is an oil painting from 1892 by the French Post-Impressionist artist Paul Gauguin. On loan to the Kunstmuseum in Basel, Switzerland for nearly a half-century, it was sold privately by the family of Rudolf Staechelin to Sheikha Al-Mayassa bint Hamad Al-Thani, in February 2015 for close to US $210 million (£155 million), one of the highest prices ever paid for a work of art. The painting was on exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, until 28 June 2015.


 

4.Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I

Price: $135 M

Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (also called The Lady in Gold or The Woman in Gold) is a painting by Gustav Klimt, completed between 1903 and 1907. The portrait was commissioned by the sitter’s husband, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer , a Jewish banker and sugar producer. The painting was stolen by the Nazis in 1941 and displayed at the Österreichische Galerie Belvedere. In 2006, following eight years of effort by the Bloch-Bauer heirs, the painting was returned to the family; it was sold the same year for $135 million, at the time a record price for a painting.

5.The Scream

Price: $119.9 M

The Scream is the popular name given to a composition created by Norwegian Expressionist artist Edvard Munch in 1893. The original German title given by Munch to his work was Der Schrei der Natur (The Scream of Nature), and the Norwegian title is Skrik (Shriek). The agonised face in the painting has become one of the most iconic images of art, seen as symbolising the anxiety of modern man.

Munch recalled that he had been out for a walk at sunset when suddenly the setting sunlight turned the clouds “a blood red”. He sensed an ‘infinite scream passing through nature’. Scholars have located the spot to a fjord overlooking Oslo, and have suggested other explanations for the unnaturally orange sky, ranging from the effects of a volcanic eruption to a psychological reaction by Munch to his sister’s commitment at a nearby lunatic asylum.